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Is there a ready to use level editor?

Is there a ready to use level editor?
by on (#54019)
Can I get a ready to use level editor through which I can define the level layout(and possibly attribute table) quickly? Writing tile numbers and attribute table in the program is impractical and takes a lot of time.
Related suggestions will be appreciated.
Re: Is there a ready to use level editor?
by on (#54020)
Nadia wrote:
Can I get a ready to use level editor through which I can define the level layout(and possibly attribute table) quickly? Writing tile numbers and attribute table in the program is impractical and takes a lot of time.
Related suggestions will be appreciated.


There are 3,

#1 is Tepples's ''FDED compressed Map editor'', But you must ask him, But one thing, he said that before you even have it: play the Tetranus(?) game on your PC.

#2 is Never-Obsolete's MapEd, Which I do not like much, And will be made obsolete by Banshaku's upcoming map editor

#3 is Banshaku's Untitled(?) Map Editor, It is a W.I.P. and is Unreleased, Unless it's released: Don't Ask

by on (#54023)
This is where it comes in handy to use PC programming experience to develop your own map/level editor. I guess there are some options out there but nothing can beat something you design yourself for your own exact purpose.
Re: Is there a ready to use level editor?
by on (#54036)
Hamtaro126 wrote:
#1 is Tepples's ''FDED compressed Map editor'', But you must ask him, But one thing, he said that before you even have it: play the Tetranus(?) game on your PC.

It's called Lockjaw, and no, you don't need to play it first. I'm out of the Tetris cloning business due to harassment from a Japanese licensee of The Tetris Company. The only thing you need from it is the Allegro 4.2 DLL, and that's only if you want to run the Win32 binary as opposed to compiling it yourself.

Anyway, here's Fairydust Editor. All it does is edit a 256x12 cell grid of 16x16 pixel tiles with a rudimentary run-length encoding scheme. I abandoned it when I switched to a more SMB1-style object encoding.

by on (#54040)
I used Mappy at some point, made custom (very hacky) LUA scripts to export the data in the format I needed it in (using 16x16 metatiles.. and that's about it). It wasn't very practical though. One way I used it was to convert a BMP file with map contents (from Jurassic Park) to metatile-/level data.

For M.C. Kids they apparently used tUME.

by on (#54049)
For now my editor is "good enough" for my current project only since I can debug if something goes wrong and added some quick hack to generate the data I needed for my mm9 proof of concept.

Unless I can find the time to finish the core and fix the remaining bugs, it would usable if you know how to avoid the bugs. In that case, I don't find that acceptable to release. If some people like to take risk that much I could release the current alpha and list the bugs to avoid (if I can remember them!).

These days I cannot even work on my nes project so I guess it will be a while before I even release it. I hope I can finish it someday. There is no official name but for now the code name is "nes studio" since the look and feel for the windows is like visual studio. Not really original I guess ;)

by on (#54069)
Tile Studio is a good general map editor. Unfortunately it doesn't deal with attributes at all. Takes a little while to get the hang of it.

I've used it in the past to make a map and generate a chr file. (I imported the bmp into TileMolester)

http://tilestudio.sourceforge.net/

http://www.segaresurrection.com/bosco.zip was a test game prototype I knocked up to test the map I created. (I was happy that I'd just killed the annoying bug in my 8 way scrolling routine. :) )

by on (#54070)
JunoMan wrote:
Tile Studio is a good general map editor. Unfortunately it doesn't deal with attributes at all.

Ideally, your game engine should compute the attributes from the metatile number. Some games use a table for this; SMB1 just uses the top two bits of the metatile number.

by on (#54071)
tepples wrote:
Ideally, your game engine should compute the attributes from the metatile number. Some games use a table for this; SMB1 just uses the top two bits of the metatile number.


True. My engine doesn't use metatiles though, and I'm not sure if Tile Studio handles metatiles either. I guess without some major changes it's not going to be really suitable then.

One day I'll change my engine to use metatiles. :)

by on (#54093)
JunoMan wrote:
Tile Studio is a good general map editor. Unfortunately it doesn't deal with attributes at all. Takes a little while to get the hang of it.

I've used it in the past to make a map and generate a chr file. (I imported the bmp into TileMolester)

http://tilestudio.sourceforge.net/

http://www.segaresurrection.com/bosco.zip was a test game prototype I knocked up to test the map I created. (I was happy that I'd just killed the annoying bug in my 8 way scrolling routine. :) )


Is the 6502 source, and Map Generator script availible for me to use? It'd appreciate it! I'll give you credit if you do!

by on (#54118)
Hamtaro126 wrote:
Is the 6502 source, and Map Generator script availible for me to use? It'd appreciate it! I'll give you credit if you do!


Alas no, its still a WIP for a complete game I'm working on (when I get time).. There is no Map Generator script. I just save the data out as binary and incbin it into the game. (actually, it's linked in.. yay for xorcyst)

And I'd expect you to give credit if you used someone elses engine for a game.
Re: Is there a ready to use level editor?
by on (#54124)
tepples wrote:
Hamtaro126 wrote:
#1 is Tepples's ''FDED compressed Map editor'', But you must ask him, But one thing, he said that before you even have it: play the Tetranus(?) game on your PC.

It's called Lockjaw, and no, you don't need to play it first. I'm out of the Tetris cloning business due to harassment from a Japanese licensee of The Tetris Company. The only thing you need from it is the Allegro 4.2 DLL, and that's only if you want to run the Win32 binary as opposed to compiling it yourself.

Anyway, here's Fairydust Editor. All it does is edit a 256x12 cell grid of 16x16 pixel tiles with a rudimentary run-length encoding scheme. I abandoned it when I switched to a more SMB1-style object encoding.



Thanks!
I have tried FDED. Its simplest of all the 4 options I had. But Its a very basic tool. I would like to enhance it a bit. The zip file I downloaded had the source (.C file). I think its a Win32 console program.
Re: Is there a ready to use level editor?
by on (#54126)
Nadia wrote:
I have tried FDED. Its simplest of all the 4 options I had. But Its a very basic tool. I would like to enhance it a bit. The zip file I downloaded had the source (.C file). I think its a Win32 console program.

It's an Allegro program, and the Windows version compiles with MinGW. There are compile time options to hide the console window for an Allegro program on Windows.

by on (#54274)
tepples wrote:
JunoMan wrote:
Tile Studio is a good general map editor. Unfortunately it doesn't deal with attributes at all.

Ideally, your game engine should compute the attributes from the metatile number. Some games use a table for this; SMB1 just uses the top two bits of the metatile number.


By metatile did you mean 16x16 tile? could you elaborate about this technique please?

by on (#54278)
SMB1 represents each level as a list of objects,* which in turn are made of 16x16 pixel metatiles. Each metatile has a number from $00 to $FF. The level decoder spits out a 13-metatile-long buffer, which gets copied into a 32x13-metatile sliding window. A lookup table translates metatiles to four 8x8 tile numbers to write to the nametable; the top two bits of the metatile number are also used as the attribute number. Often, multiple metatiles use the same nametable tiles: both kinds of ? blocks (coin and power-up) use the ? tiles, and the "invisible block" common in platform-hell level hacks uses the same blank tiles as the empty cell, not to mention the cloud-bushes that you can't unsee.


* There are four layers of background objects in SMB1, but I'll save the details for a ROM hacking forum.