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Last updated on Oct-18-2019 Download

Will one of these programmers work for

Will one of these programmers work for
by on (#51064)
I'm trying to get something cheap, but will also be able to support new and old technology(eprom,eeprom,flash). I was thinking about getting the more expensive batronix programmer but I'm not sure.
I'd like to atleast be able to program:
2600
nes
snes
Maybe neo geo mvs

Will either of these support this?
http://cgi.ebay.ca/USB-Universal-EPROM- ... 286.c0.m14
http://cgi.ebay.ca/TOP2007-USB-EPROM-EE ... 286.c0.m14

by on (#51065)
None of those will "program 2600, nes, snes, neogeo mvs". They should list the devices they support. For 2600 (not sure but likely), NES, and SNES, 8bit MaskROMs are used so you don't need any fancy programmer. Something like NeoGeo uses large 16bit MaskROMs (as well as EPROMs). If you are hoping to bootleg NeoGeo MVS cartridges I'd suggest you not bother as pirates are waaaay ahead of you. You can buy a 100-in-1 MVS cartridge these days for around $70. Also MVS games, particularly larger ones, use tons of large ROM chips. Infact I don't think you could even find a programmable 64 megabit Flash or EPROM in DIP packaging.

Both of the programmers you linked should work for programming the type of eproms used in typical homemade 2600, nes, and snes cartridges. But as I said in your other topic if you just want to play games, there are better options for SNES as well as NES. I'm not sure about 2600. From a money stand point the better options for SNES and NES are Flash Cart type devices.

by on (#51068)
So your saying it can't program them...but it can?
I don't want to pirate mvs carts, I own an mvs arcade machine and would like to be able to fix my carts if a problem occurred or if I bought a non working board cheap.
I'd like to make my own carts and maybe try my hand at reproduction carts and homebrew for nes/atari.

by on (#51070)
I believe 16-bit EPROMs could have more than 40 pins. For most programmers there are adapters available for different types of chip packages, but mostly for surface-mount parts. So you may need an adapter if you want to program everything.

by on (#51073)
Memblers wrote:
I believe 16-bit EPROMs could have more than 40 pins. For most programmers there are adapters available for different types of chip packages, but mostly for surface-mount parts. So you may need an adapter if you want to program everything.

I think some have up to 48 pins, but most have 40 pins 16 bit wise.
I'm just wondering if its actually capable of burning a nes/snes eprom.

by on (#51074)
NES and Super NES use 8-bit data bus, which means one EPROM, usually 32 pins or thereabouts.

by on (#51075)
Can someone tell me if these programmers will be able to program eproms for atari 2600,nes,snes etc?

by on (#51085)
Trying to find this out asap so I can order one.

by on (#51086)
I was trying to clarify your wording. Yes, both those programmers can program standard 8bit EPROMs I'm pretty sure, though I didn't look at the device list. For NeoGeo you would need a 16bit adapter to replace most of the chips, however if a MaskROM for a game goes bad that is bigger than 32mbits you will have to really get creative replacing it. Also I have no idea with MVS boards even use a standard ROM pinout for the MaskROMs. However if a program ROM goes bad those probably are on EPROMs though I could be wrong as I'm just guessing as most of my arcade games are like that.

So if you get one of those programmers you should be able to program the kinds of chips you would likely use in a 2600, NES, or SNES cartridge. For NeoGeo though you'd either need a much more expensive programmer, or an adapter.

By the way, 16bit EPROMs of 4Mbit size and maybe smaller if they exist have 40 pins. But 8Mbit and larger have 42pins. You can simulate a 16bit EPROM with 8bit chips if you need to do that.

And I wouldn't rush to order something like this when you have to ask other people if it's the thing you should get, you should do more research if possible before buying a bunch of things you don't yet understand how to use. Not all EPROM programmers are created equally. It's best to research and figure out which one meets your needs than to just rush into buying something and end up having to spend even more money later. Also depending on your needs you may be able to buy a cheaper programmer that will still do the job.

by on (#51088)
Only reason I'm "Rushing" to get one is because shipping time will likely be 2 weeks or close to that. I know a few things I want to do with it right away and how to do them.

by on (#51096)
Well, the first one should be enough for 2600, NES, and SNES projects.