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Last updated on Oct-18-2019 Download

Complexity

Complexity
by on (#32650)
In this post, tokumaru wrote:
You'll hardly see an NROM or CNROM with complex scrolling and animations, large sprites, and so on...

Well, maybe not really complex stuff, but still complex enough to make a game really addictive to play I hope. Keep in mind that most commercial games uses the memory inneficiently, and as a result we homebrewers can make significantly better games fitting the same amount of memory, NesSnake 2 is the proof.

by on (#32654)
Bregalad wrote:
Well, maybe not really complex stuff, but still complex enough to make a game really addictive to play I hope.

Sure, I didn't mean there are no good games using little PRG-ROM, there certainly are. It's just that usually they look like first-gen material. You know, towards the end of the life of a system, it usually struggles to keep up with the newer-gen games, and some impressive graphical work is usually done at this time. But this often requires unusual tricks, a fair use of memory and such things that do not go well with first-gen games.

Quote:
Keep in mind that most commercial games uses the memory inneficiently, and as a result we homebrewers can make significantly better games fitting the same amount of memory, NesSnake 2 is the proof.

We have many advantages over the programmers at the time... we have the best development systems people back then couldn't even dream of. Yet, most homebrewers seem to be afraid of taking on larger, more ambitious projects. Maybe as a way to "increase the chances of success", like you already said. And indeed, most ambitious projects die early, in spite of all the advantages we have over the professional programmers at the time.

Maybe it's just because we don't have enough time to dedicate to this, while programmers back then did this as their profession, and usually worked in groups.

by on (#32660)
tokumaru wrote:
Maybe it's just because we don't have enough time to dedicate to this, while programmers back then did this as their profession, and usually worked in groups.

In a lot of cases, we don't have the time because activities that contribute to feeding ourselves take precedence. On retrousb.com, the parts to build a discrete Game Pak cost just under $20, not counting assembly time, the EPROM programmer, the box, or the manual. How much are people willing to pay for a new NES game? One might as well develop for Windows or Mac OS X.

Complexity looks like a good splitting point.

by on (#32667)
Complexity in a game or in the programming of a game is a can of worms. It's not bad, but it can be hard to get into if you're just starting out or working alone.

by on (#32669)
Yeah, we definitely have many advantages over developpers at that time :
- Better knownledge of hardware
- Likely better tools, and obviously better PCs
- More knownledge about how to use memory efficiently
- As more games are released today, it's more likely that existing games inspire us to do similar things in our games that didn't exist at the time

However, we lack potential custommers and overall knownledge about game programming that they probably had. Also, developping in group should without a doubt be MUCH more efficient than developping alone, I'm certain of this. If you're a group of, say, 4 people, you'll likely be 16 times more efficient than programming alone, as whenever the lead of the group lacks an idea one other person has the right idea. The problems are that :

- To findd a serious developping group you first have to proof that you're able to do something on your own so that there is people interested in joining you
- Many other developpers known themselves on the net, but to really developp a game in group it have to be a real-world group, so that you can actually talk, exchange drawings, ideas, etc... with your partners. Stuck with writing messages and sending files to them is kinda limitating
- Not that many people are really interested into developping software for obsolete machines, as there isn't that many homebrew game that are really good. The day where we start to have a couple of really good homebrew games, more people will be interested in homebrewing and that'll be the snowball effect.