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Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?

Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120308)
Hi,

I just got a UK PAL NES but I live in the US. Can I use the NTSC AC Adapter or do I need a converter?

If I need a converter would this work? http://www.voltageconverters.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=VC100W

Console says: AC9v 1.3A

AC Adapter that came with it (not official) says:
Input: 240v - 50 Hz
Output: 9v - 400mA

Not even sure if it's the right adapter but I assume it is?
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120310)
US is 120 volts, 60Hz. UK is 240 volts, 50Hz; you're going to need a lot more than just an AC adapter, and I have no idea if the polarity on the AC adapters (towards the console) are reversed like they are between the US NES and the Famicom.
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120311)
As far as I know, both the NTSC and PAL NESes use the same 9VAC input. It seems to me that finding a new 120V-to-9V adapter is probably easier (and likely cheaper?) than buying a 120V-to-240V adapter.

I'm a little wary of the one you were given being only rated for 400mA, though; ISTR that's very close to what the NES consumes at minimum. If you do buy a new one, I think I've heard the general consensus be "at least 7V, at most 13V, and at least 3/4 A", and, due to how the NES works, you're most likely safe with either AC or DC.

(Koitsu: ungrounded AC adapters don't have a polarity.)

Tangentially, what are you using to display the PAL image it'll produce?
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120312)
You can use a local NES AC brick, 9V AC at about 1A.

Your bigger problem is that your TV likely will not like the 50Hz signal, and if it does, it probably shows black and white image due to not knowing what PAL is.
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120313)
lidnariq I have an official US Nintendo AC Adapter, the 9v but I don't want to chance blowing this up after I spent $130. I didn't check if that will fit, it looked like it did. I read that you can do that but it was not from a reliable site like this.

I guess the safest option is to buy a UK NES Adapter on ebay (official) and then pick up that 100w converter? Unless my US Adapter will work but I am not trying it unless someone knows for sure.

I wound up buying a Vizio TV for my room, and it supports 576i/p 25fps. I didn't buy it for that reason but noticed my PAL DVDs were playing correctly which was hard since I had it upscaled to 1080p but it is fully PAL compatible and good price. I know it's strange as my big TV refuses to support PAL: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009IB ... UTF8&psc=1
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120315)
The US power supply should be fine, as has been said, the NES just needs 9V. I live in the UK but have a US NTSC NES (technically a US NES mainboard in the old case - I wanted to play games at full 60Hz, can't imagine wanting to go the other way!), and the power supply I had for my old UK PAL NES works absolutely fine with it.

I'd heard Vizio TVs are pretty handy when it comes to PAL/NTSC support, they're decent for the price.
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120316)
The US NES adapter (120VAC->1.3A@9VAC) should be just fine. I remember people mentioning they've done whole-brain swaps of PAL and NTSC NESes (swapping crystal, PPU, CPU, and CIC) and had it work fine, so the adapter should be completely compatible too.

In any case, if it asks for 9VAC at 850mA, then any power supply rated for 9VAC at roughly that amount of current will be fine.

(Regarding the vizio TV thing: I was kinda surprised when I discovered that my Acer LCD computer monitors support 240p/60 and 288p/50. In fact, the latter is the only 50Hz mode it can parse.)
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120348)
neshiggins wrote:
I wanted to play games at full 60Hz, can't imagine wanting to go the other way!

Some NES games' vblank routines require the longer vertical blank period of the PAL NES. (Asterix anyone?) And a developer might want to test on a 50 Hz console in order to make a game that adapts its music and game speed to 50 Hz as Codemasters games do.
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120363)
neshiggins wrote:
The US power supply should be fine, as has been said, the NES just needs 9V. I live in the UK but have a US NTSC NES (technically a US NES mainboard in the old case - I wanted to play games at full 60Hz, can't imagine wanting to go the other way!), and the power supply I had for my old UK PAL NES works absolutely fine with it.

I'd heard Vizio TVs are pretty handy when it comes to PAL/NTSC support, they're decent for the price.


My US Power Supply won't fit my PAL NES, the size is a little small. I have the "NES" version made by Mattel. Yes the output is correct: AC9v 1.3A and if I modded it would run fine, but I wound up ordering an UK power supply instead.

As far as why I wanted one is that PAL games run to fast on NTSC console, and there are a handful (not many) that are exclusive, but buying a PAL NES is certainly not for everyone and not for most games as they are NTSC. Offhand I can name only two, Smurfs and Mario Bros Classic lol

Yes I recommend the Vizio for anyone who wants both NTSC/PAL compatibility.
Re: Playing a UK PAL NES in USA?
by on (#120562)
TmEE wrote:
You can use a local NES AC brick, 9V AC at about 1A.

Your bigger problem is that your TV likely will not like the 50Hz signal, and if it does, it probably shows black and white image due to not knowing what PAL is.


Actually, CRT TVs that were made closer to end of life timeframe of CRT TVs (when LCD were made, but still some CRTs were manufactured) can be set to PAL, SECAM or NTSC (both NTSC1 and NTSC2).

I have this TV of Royal Lux brand (you probably don't know about it, I only know and have this tv because my Mom was making TVs there ;)) which has this setup and I've seen it on Sony CRT TVs (produced after 2k), so probably many of them has this setting in menu.

If it doesn't it is either old CRT or some local brand. I think same is with LCD TVs manufactured by international corporations (it is cheaper to make TV that support all kinds of signal and ship it than to make one TV for one "region"). If it wouldn't switch automatically, you should be able to do it in menu of TV.